Monday, April 1, 2013

Covered Greenhouse Garden

While we're waiting for our fence to suntan before we stain it, I took on another outdoor project this weekend.


Yep, it's Garden 2013! And there's a reason for the Oregon Trail look, I promise. Since we've moved here, we've had some windy nights and some CRAZY 30 mph windy nights. On top of that, the neighbors all comment on the foggy summers. So to help my future tomatoes out, I decided to build them a little green house to protect them from the wind and to elevate the temperature during the colder days. This should also help me with the "year round" gardening Bay Area people seem so keen on.


I started out with 2x12s at 8 feet and 4 feet. (I do not recommend 2x12s as they are very expensive, and you can get the same results with stacked 2x6s.) We leveled out the dirt a bit before assembling them.


I used the pocket hole system once again to join the pieces of wood. Then, because we have some resident moles in the yard (ew), we stapled some chicken wire to the base and flipped the whole thing over.


Then we built a frame to go on top out of 2x2s and 2x4s for corner braces. This will be the base for the covered part.



Then we attached 1/2" 10-foot PVC pipe to create the arches.


I put one screw into the inside bottom of each pipe (to keep it from slipping), then secured it with a pipe clamp.



Now I'm still not sure if this next step was necessary; I bought some wire mesh and used a LOT of electrical tape to secure it to the pipes, which was very time consuming. My reasoning was to provide more stability for the frame as well as the plastic sheeting, but I'm thinking some 1x2s screwed into the PVC would've worked just as well. 



I stapled some 3.5 mil plastic to the 2x2 frame, which I do not recommend attempting while it is breezy outside. Plastic everywhere, suffocation, etc.


I attached two hinges on one of the short 4' sides.


And some plastic chain on the long 8' side. (I do not recommend plastic chain, as it bends and stretches far too easily. I bought it because I thought it would be easier to work, rust-free, and lightweight, which it is....but the stretching is no bueno.)




I'm planning on rigging up an automatic watering system for my soaker hose, so I installed this adapter in the side. The garden hose will go on the blue side and the soaker hose will come out the other side.


On the last Saturday of every month, Berkeley puts out a bunch of free compost near the Berkeley Marina. We went and shoveled some into some boxes and mixed it with existing soil from the yard and a healthy amount of pine needles.


Now it's time for planting! I'm still working on the layout, but I've got my tomatoes planted and safe from the cold and wind. I'm planning on a bunch of basil, squash, swish chard, onions, garlic, and some herbs. But mostly it's gonna be tomatoes and basil. Nothing beats homemade pasta sauce with home-grown veggies! MMmMMmmm I can't wait.



UPDATE:

I put an outdoor thermometer in the greenhouse you know, for science. As I feared, the temperatures under the cover rose easily to 100 degrees on a sunny day, and sometimes even higher (I think the record was 123 degrees). Cutting vent holes in the top only helped lower the temp by about 5 degrees. Not to mention those damn constant winds we get up here had their way with the plastic sheet, tearing it from the staples, which in turn allowed wind into the greenhouse, which caused some structural damage to the cover frame. 

SO I decided to replace the plastic with a more breathable garden fabric. I ordered an extra thick specimen from Gardener's Supply called "GardenQuilt", which is very sturdy and should hold up to the constant winds. I also wrapped it around the whole frame and stapled the shit out of it because this wind is apparently not to be messed with.


It was a very warm day today and I'm happy to report that the temperatures were a good 10-15 degrees cooler than with the plastic cover. 

Other updates included adding a latch to keep the cover from scooting around in the wind. The wind tore the latch right out of the wood...go figure. So I just screwed in a scrap block of wood on the opposite side of the bed to keep the frame from getting pushed. I also repaired some of the diagonal braces on the frame with some wood glue and extra screws.

Then I automated my watering system with a timer:


Which plugs into a garden hose, which plugs into a drip-line system, which plugs into my soaker hose. Now I don't have to worry about watering my plants when I'm on vacation (AKA forgetting/not paying attention/being lazy)!

Thanks for all the wonderful feedback and smart tips everyone! You've given me even better ideas for the next greenhouse. 

And for those wondering what I'm planting or for those wishing to criticize my inexperience at spacing out a garden, here's a diagram! I blog with authority, I know, but I really have no idea what I'm doing. 




UPDATE
For a plant-by-plant report on how my crop did in the greenhouse this summer, click here! 

186 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Hiii I love this. Roughly how much do you think a project like this cost ?

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    2. Goooooood question. I haven't done a budget breakdown yet, but I imagine this cost me around $250? Though if you use 2x6 boards instead of 2x12s, it will be SIGNIFICANTLY cheaper. If I do manage to round up all my receipts, I'll update the post with a more accurate count. Thanks for stopping by!

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    3. I just bought all the materials the other day and spend about 105 dollars at home depot. :) that doesnt include any soil or plants just material.

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    4. Awesome Nicole! What size wood did you buy for the frame? 2x6?
      A tip for everyone: check around to see if your city has free compost giveaways. Craigslist can also be a good source. This can save you a lot of money!

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    5. one more thing that might help would be a latch-lock to hold the top down during windy days....
      but that depends on where you live and if it gets that windy.

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    6. I actually did buy a latch to hold it down, but the frame ended up being plenty heavy so I didn't need to use it. Good suggestion for something that's a lighter build though!

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  2. This was so thoughtfully made. I even love the Oregon Trail look. :) It will be lovely to see your garden as it grows.

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  3. Wow, impressive, you even thought to include a hose adapter! Very nice job! I agree, with Yvonne, I'm looking forward to seeing my pics of your growing garden.

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    1. Thank you Elizabeth! I'm sure I'll have an update mid-summer.

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  4. Yes, 3 strips of wood along the length of the "bonnet" would have stabilized it, and probably better. Screw through the PVC into the wood, or drill both and use bolts. One strip at the top and the other two at about 10 and 2 on the curve is all you need.

    That electrical tape is not going to hold up.

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    1. I do like the lack of sagging in the plastic that the structure of the wire mesh provides, but that's purely aesthetic. Next time I would go with the wood strips.

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    2. I like your method using the wire mesh..

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    3. Yes, the mesh gives rise to the possibility of vents down the road. I like the lack of sagging and structure too and plants will enjoy growing on it.

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    4. Cool I need a mini garden back by my fence in the backyard this will be perfect. I will try for next year.... Thanks

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    5. If the tape doesn't hold up, you could always wrap wire or use a pair of those PVC brackets back-to-back to clamp down the wire mesh.

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    6. or cable ties would probably work too!

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  5. Awesome very good detailed pics & instructions. Now I need to figure out a way to make it movable as I have to move often.

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    1. You could potential take this one apart and move it. If you used wood cross beams rather than wire mesh, this would be much easier to do. of course if you're moving yourself in a small sedan, this is all going to be pretty challenging, but in a truck/van it should be easy!

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    2. Just trow some old lawnmower wheels under it. Really give it the "Oregon Trail" look following your car.

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  6. I found you via a pin that took me to alternative-energy-gardning.blogspot.com. So glad you watermarked your photos, I like to give credit where it is due and this is a truly great idea! I hadn't seen any with the hose either.

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    1. Weird! Pinterest pinners are notorious for not pinning from the source, so I thought I'd try the watermark thing just in case. Glad you found it back to my blog and thanks for the nice comments :)

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    2. Same here. I just clicked on your photographs (beautiful and detailed)from the other site and it led me here.

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  7. Looks Great! One Suggestion tho, you are gonna have to figure out a way to vent it, because on a sunny day the temps go way up.

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    1. You are absolutely right! I have a little temperature monitor on it and it's gotten up to 100 degrees in there on a sunny day, even when the outside temp was in the 60s! I did cut some vent holes in the top, which reduced the temp about 5 degrees, but ultimately I decided to order some garden cloth to replace it. I just need to wait for the crazy wind we've been having the past few days to die down so I can install it. I'll have an update once it's done! Thanks for stopping by!

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    2. Hi, I just stumbled across this blog the other day from a friend that posted on Facebook. I am actually in the process of making this. My boyfriend and I have finished most of process. The base and lid are finished, except for the plastic, hinges and chains. We ran out of daylight, so I have rocks sitting on the four corners to "even things out", because our wood from Home Depot was a bit warped, which ticked me off, but I digress... lol. I was just reading through some of your comments and saw this comment about the temperature being high. I live in Georgia, and summer MAY get here some time soon, (not so sure this year, seeing as how it's almost May, and still cold...), and I was wondering about the holes you cut in the top. While this is a good idea for the summer, how would I correct this in the winter months without replacing all of the plastic? Also, I have not purchased my soil yet, and I need to gauge about how much soil I will need to buy. Just wondering if you had an idea of how many pounds you used. Thanks,

      Arminda

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    3. Hi Arminda,
      Warped wood is so annoying! I always check my lumber at the hardware stores because it seems like 50% of it is useless due to warping. Tedious but necessary.
      For the vent holes, I cut 3 sides of the rectangle and tucked the rest of the plastic flap behind the wire mesh. I can easily tape it closed again in the winter if needed. However, I do have plans to replace the plastic with garden cloth since the temperatures are just too hot for the plants right now, even with the vent holes. We don't get very cold winters here in the Bay Area (rarely gets below 35), so hopefully the cloth will suffice year-round. If you live in an area with extreme temperatures, I can't think of a quick way to switch between cloth and plastic without just ripping it all off each time and stapling down the new stuff (unless you built two covers and stored one in your garage for part of the year).
      Hope that helps!

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    4. Yes, swappable covers could be the answer, and not all that hard to do.

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    5. Oh and to answer your question about how much soil you need:
      The bags of soil you buy at the store typically have a volumetric measurement (cubic feet) that can help you determine the amount you need for the volume of your garden. For instance, if your raised-bed garden is 4'x4' and 1-foot deep, that's 16 cubic feet. A lot of soil comes in bags of 2 cubic feet, so you'll need 8 of these bags.
      Hope that helps!

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    6. Thanks, I am somewhat of a "math nerd", so I just figured out how many cubic feet, and then tried to find a conversion for pounds for volume lol. Not needed as I looked up the stores website and realized they show it in cubic feet as you stated lol. I got it though. Bought all my soil, food, and compost today, and I am DYING to start planting now! I have been fighting the urge all day to start on it, but I have two big exams tomorrow and I am in cram-mode! lol. Anyway, I went ahead and finished the project this morning after I got up, and I just went ahead and decided against the vents. I am not really in a position to do two swappable covers, as we're renting a rather small house right now, and we currently have no garage, (just a very crammed shed). After thinking about it last night, I decided that I would use two pieces of wood in the corners where the lid lifts up, opposite the hinges, and prop the lid up on hot days. The 2x4's in the corner of the lid will make an excellent "brace". Thank you for all the ideas. I also decided after we moved it into the back yard today, that due to the lid being so high, it wasn't exactly ergonomic to pull down smoothly. I felt like I was going to drop it a couple times, so I will be purchasing a cheap brass handle from the Dollar Tree to add to one side that I can grab and feel that I am bringing it down in a more stable fashion. Thanks again for all your help! And happy growing! :)

      -Arminda

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    7. We have done something similar but are using cinderblock (16" x 8" each) and 2 rows high. We're using the pvc pipe for the hoops as well. I am planning to use a 1/2" pvc pipe the length of the bed on the outside and attaching the plastic to that, then rolling it up like an old roller shade on the sides when I need ventilation . Before we cover it with the plastic we are covering it with garden cloth to keep the Japanese Beetles out & other flying monsters that would make our plants their dinner. Also using the 1/2" pipe for the purlins on the inside top and at 10 and 2 - already tried that before without and the wind & rain just laughed at us while it took the top down in less than 5 minutes LOL

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  8. I'm not familiar with a pocket hole system. Can you explain that a bit?
    Thanks

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    1. This is what I bought after learning some new projects and it works great. http://www.kregtool.com/Kreg-Jigreg-Prodview.html

      Hope this helps.

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    2. Yes, I use the Kreg Jig as well and highly recommend it!
      Here's a great video that explains how pocket hole joinery works.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaSWZJFZQh8
      It's a really fast and strong way to join wood for just about anything and very beginner-friendly.

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  9. This is the exact idea I had in mind! Yay, thanks for posting this~it will definitely cut time for me in laying out the things I need to do this project:))

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  10. Oh my lord... I have been contemplating our container garden all week and where to begin and now I get this in my inbox. I literally said:

    "AWWW SEE NOW THAT'S WHAT I'M TALKIN ABOUT!"!

    out loud.

    my family thinks I'm crazy (er)

    lol Absolutely brilliant idea... Thank you!

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    1. That is hilarious! My family thinks my ideas are crazy too :)

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    2. Is pine needles good for garden soil?

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    3. I've read that dry pine needles can be good for acid-loving plants such as tomatoes, onions, etc. Some have said otherwise. I'm no expert, so I suggest you do some internet research and maybe experiment with your own garden. Good luck!

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  11. Awesome ... Thanks! haha Kiana...I said the same thing! :)

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  12. What a great idea and I have been looking at numerous garden ideas from raised beds to a keyhole garden. I love this you have some the best pictures and instructions I have seen to date! I do have a question...I live in Michigan and am wondering how well this will hold up in the colder temps? That is, could this be used for cold weather gardening? Thanks again for the post!

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    1. I can't say how well it holds up for anything under 43 degrees (that's the coldest it's gotten since I built this thing). However I imagine it would be pretty effective for preventing frost damage to your crops. Luckily here in the Bay Area, it's very rare to get below freezing temperatures, so I never have to worry about that.
      Thanks for stopping by!

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  13. when I first saw this I was like 'oh that's pretty neat' n then instructions on how to make one that are so simple even I could do it!!
    I'm pretty keen on giving this a go.. what a fantastic idea ^_^

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    1. Yay! Glad I could make it seem possible :) Good luck!

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  14. Thanks very much for taking the time to document this. It's a great idea, and I'm already making plans for modifying the cover to fit my existing beds.
    BTW, gophers suck. :(

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    1. Thanks for taking the time to read it! Good luck with your garden and those pesky gophers!

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  15. Did you have a complete parts list, and what sort of wood did you use for the base box, redwood ???

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    1. Let's see if I can do this on the fly:
      -2x6s redwood (or 2x12s, which are significantly more expensive) cut to desired lengths
      -2x2s for cover frame
      -2x4s for bracing
      -Wood screws
      -10' 1/2" PVC pipe
      -garden fencing
      -duct tape or electrical tape
      -pipe clamps
      -plastic or garden cloth
      -staple gun + staples
      -hinges
      -eye hooks
      -chain

      Hope that helps!

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    2. Any project that uses duct tape is #1 in my book! This just proves it ;)

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  16. I too raise bed garden & have been trying to figure out a protection system for my plants with this unseasonable weather & cold we're experiencing currently (80 on Monday, 31 Friday morning (20 windchill). So I love your "mini greenhouse" covering & will probably modify mine to swap between the plastic & netting in an attempt to prevent some of the more voracious critters.

    My repayment to you is the following recipe, since you love basil & tomatoes the way my family does too. This is a summer staple in our home & one my daughter-in-law & son look forward to each visit!

    Insalata de Caprese

    2 medium to large Roma tomatoes
    1/4 cup fresh basil leaves
    4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese
    4 teaspoons balsamic vinegar (highest quality & flavor you can afford)
    1 tablespoon fresh extra virgin olive oil (time to break out the good stuff
    salt and pepper, to taste


    Directions
    1. Slice the tomato in approximately 1/4 +/- inch thick slices. Do the same for the mozzarella.
    2. On a serving plate alternate layers between the tomatoes & mozzarella in a ring or rows.
    3. Julienne basil leaves keeping a few whole as garnish, spread over tomatoes & mozzarella.
    4. Drizzle with olive oil and balsamic vinegar.
    5. Season to taste with salt and pepper, if desired.

    I usually make certain I have enough ingredients to double or even triple this but, this is the recipe my grandmother used.

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    1. That looks delicious!! Thanks for the recipe and happy gardening to you!

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  17. Stephanie, I like the idea. It reminds me of a prairie schooner sitting on the ground. I wish my two girls were this handy in the garden.

    Here's a suggestion: If you want to use this hoop bed as a 'focal' point in your yard, and for a true covered wagon look, add 4 x 4 posts as stilts to raise it off the ground and install a pair (or 4) of those 'decorative' wagon wheels you can buy from Harbor Freight, and mount them on the side you can see. If you go with the off-the-ground look, you'd need some type of support to keep the soil from falling out the bottom. I'd suggest cedar fence boards with half an inch of spacing between them to allow for drainage. Four foot lengths of 1 x 6 fencing would probably be sufficient to hold the weight as long as the soil wasn't soaking wet. Having an air-space below the frame might also moderate the soil temperature a bit too.

    My other concern was you didn't use pressure-treated lumber or 'ground contact' lumber...it's gonna rot eventually. If you do decide to raise it above ground on posts, use pressure-treated 4 x 4 posts and you'll have no worries there.

    Also, I've seen some pretty tiny little moles...the babies the leave the nest in springtime...they're not much longer than little field mice (and just as skinny) and can certainly get through chicken wire.

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    1. Thanks for the suggestions!
      I chose not to use pressure-treated wood because I did not want the chemicals seeping into my garden over time. I used redwood for the frame, which is rot-resistant and should last for several years at least. This garden bed is a temporary solution until we figure out how we want to landscape the backyard, so redwood was sufficient for my purposes. For those looking for something more permanent, I recommend brick, concrete or other type of masonry to build a raised-garden bed.
      Thanks for stopping by!

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  18. I really love this idea! I think I'm going to do this with my bird netting for my new strawberry box!

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  19. Lovely and amazingly clear explanations but I wold not use PVC or plastic because of the chemicals they emanate... Wood and glass would be my choice, although much heavier.

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  20. I think you did a wonderful job. You are a creative beautiful woman, i would think about getting a patent if i were you. -Adam 25/m/IL

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  21. You could remove the duct tape & use zip ties? Sometimes called cable ties. This might hold up better? This is awesome, I'm totally going to do something similar!

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    1. Zip ties are a great idea! Best of luck :)

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    2. Make sure to use either clear or white zip ties...colored or black ones deteriorate very quickly.

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  22. This is fantastic! Clear pictures, easy-to-understand instructions. We are going to try it this summer. Thank you!

    http://truenorthtreasures.blogspot.com

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  23. This.is.awesome. One thing though, I've just learned in a Master Gardener course not to use pine needles. They release chemicals as they decompose that prevent other plants from growing. Which is typically why nothing grows underneath pine trees. SO your tomatoes might do well at first, but over time they will not.

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    1. Interesting! I've actually read quite a lot about pine needles increasing the acid level of soils, which is great for acid-loving plants such as tomatoes and onions. It might not be so great for other plants though, so who knows. This is my first year gardening in this area under these conditions, so we'll see!
      Thanks for stopping by :)

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  24. Nice Job Stephanie, Cold frames with single pane windows* placed on top wood frames (* cheap or craigslist freebies ) with rocks in the bottom for solar heat absorption,make a nice start area for young plants, in pots for select transplanting into your little green house grow room ! just a idea for cheap starts for growing veggies Have a Great Day enjoy those Veggies Fresh Steve

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  25. Oh my goodness...I am so going to make me some of these greenhouse boxes. I love them. I wrote the instructions down, drew out the pictures and will be getting all the needed material. Thank you for putting this on here. I am trying to make my little 2 acre yard produce as much food as possible and this just added to my plans....again...thank you. Jeanne Dennis/50 years old/ Louisiana

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    1. Yay! I'm so glad I could help! Best of luck with your garden this year :)

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  26. I live in Wyoming where it always seems to be windy. My friend and her husband did some small green houses that look about like this but they can roll up the sides and they are easily moveable. No worries about the stability of the plastic as they are a smaller area. Will see about getting photos from her. If I remember right they are about three foot tall on a 2' x 4' base. Everything else about the same. Great for small areas. I am going to try both sizes this summer. Thanks for sharing.

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  27. Very nice project, but I would add a few observations -
    1) the chicken wire is a good idea, but the holes are still too large to eliminate moles completely. You would be wise to use a few layers, staggered to make smaller holes, or to use 1/2" hardware cloth. Either way, it will have to be replaced after a few years. If you play the lottery and win, consider stainless steel instead.
    2) the 2x12s are nice looking, but expensive. The most economical siding I've found is slab wood from a sawmill - the first outer cuts from a log that are flat on the inside but have the outer curved wood, and sometimes even bark, of the original log.
    3) I agree that pressure treated wood is not ideal. Redwood is a good alternative in your area. The best method I have found is to use a rot-resistant wood like cedar or locust as a sacrificial strip that is in contact with the soil surface. With soil-filled frames such as yours, you could line the inside of the wood, but moisture will still get trapped eventually. That is why inexpensive materials, or more expensive and permanent ones, like plasticized wood, make more sense in the long run.
    4) the wire mesh reinforcement may be a bit overbuilt, but it looks good and is sturdy. When you replace the tape, as eventually you will have to do, consider using a few hose clamps, and some pipe insulation around them to reduce abrasion on the plastic cover.
    5) greenhouse supply companies make a product called wiggle wire that is used to clamp fabric and plastic coverings on flat surfaces. By incorporating that into your design, you could switch coverings depending on the season. It also makes it easier to achieve a taut covering, reducing wear and abrasion from wind - your plastic and fabric will last longer if it is tightly fastened
    6) you definitely do want a way to secure the top. If the wind gets underneath somehow, it could tear the entire structure apart - I have seen 100' greenhouses destroyed because of improper anchoring.
    7) it is unlikely that any organic material in moderation will negatively affect your plants, but the pine needle application should suffice for a few years. Do regular soil tests to assess the true needs of your crops, and make plenty of compost. Municipal compost is great, but for food crops you want to be fully informed of what is being added, and municipal compost might have round-up treated grass clippings, foliar-spray treated leaves, and other questionable sources. Caveat emptore.

    All that said, you're craftsmanship is admirable and your presentation of the process very clear and helpful. Can't wait to see the next evolution.

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    1. GREAT tips! Garden 2014 is going to be even better :)

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  28. I've got to tell you this post made my entire day! Sooooo excited about this. My family just relocated and while we wait for the day we can build a huge bio-dome, we were sad to not be able to grow anything. This is the perfect compromise for us!! Affordable and amazing idea!!! Thank you sooooo much!

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    1. A bio dome would be AWESOME! When we win the lottery some day perhaps :)
      Thanks for stopping by!

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  29. Have just discovered your blog & bookmarked your site & looking forward to having a look around. Love the greenhouse idea, have done something similar a few years ago but smaller so it didn't take long to have to move things out. This is a great idea, especially for tomatoes........ I do always seem to have great luck with them & have my 'hedge' running up beside the deck( I have pics of us popping our heads over top). I keep thinking I'd like to start my own blog too, filled with all kinds of crazy ideas for my garden, craft projects, kitchen goodies but mine would also be filled with kitty cats ( although I do like doggies too ). LOL !!!

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    1. You should totally start a blog! It's free and a great way to share your crazy ideas with friends and family. And you might be giving the rest of us inspiration too :)

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  30. I found all the materials today and was looking for a way to make a cover that we didnt have to put on an off manually everyday. Thanks so much we have some modifications of course seeing as how I went with found materials verses buying. Im a reduce,re-use, re-purpous, recycle kinda person :)

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    1. Good for you! I wish I had the patience to scavenge for everything I needed, but I wanted to start planting my seeds before it got too late. Best of luck!

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  31. this is a wonderfully fabulous idea and it's completely off-the-charts awesome that you've provided a DIY plan :) so my question is.... ever built a chicken coop for 6 chickens? lol because i REALLY need a plan for that

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    1. Haha, can't say I've ever built a chicken coop. For this design, I just took all my favorite parts of other greenhouse designs and combined/adapted them to suit my needs. A little thoughtful design and handiness with tools can take you a long way, so I bet you could do the same for your chicken coop. Best of luck!

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  32. Love it! Thank you for sharing!!

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  33. Fantastic idea! Perfect for early starting on your garden in the mountains. Thanks!

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  34. Stephanie, I love it!! Can you show us how you finished the ends? What did you do with all the extra plastic as you folded it down?
    Thanks!

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    1. It's a little hard to describe, but you can kinda see it in the first photo. I basically just folded it over itself and stapled it to the frame several times. It doesn't matter much how you do it as long as you seal it off so there aren't any huge holes. Hope that helps!

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  35. Looks great - thank you for the specs - hope to have it ready for next spring! Happy Trails!

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  36. What is the pocket hole system?

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    1. Pocket holes are a technique used to join wood together that is very strong and easy to do. Google "kreg jig" for a cool tool that makes the pocket hole thing seem like a breeze!

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  37. you know, I am thinking about using this as a chicken run ... during the day when the dog is on patrol so gound-bound predators will not try to attack them

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  38. also, check around for horse stables in your area, often they will let you haul away stall sweepings that have aged for a while outdoors

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  39. i would add a screen on either side to promote airflow... also does anyone know it will allow enough lite if kept closed ?

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  40. Hey just a thought!!! Why not use small zip ties to attach the wire mesh to the pvc pipe instead of electrical tape? You could trim the ends so they wouldn't punch a hole in your plastic. Might work!!!!!
    I love this and hope to make it out of salvaged lumber I have collected!!! Can't wait to try it!!!

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  41. Do you this this will work for zone 4. Any idea what temperature it is inside of the cold frame?

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    1. I am just an amateur gardener so I can't say what will work best for zone 4. I will say that on a sunny day the temps inside this thing get to over 100 degrees while the ambient temperature outside is in the 70s or 80s. I have plans to swap out the plastic for garden cloth to fix this. For now I just go lift the cover if I see the temperatures climbing (I have a temperature monitor inside the greenhouse)

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  42. Oh my goodness, I love your ideas! So creative and as I've just gotten back into gardening, very inspiring. I wanted to leave a comment for mndgrrl about the chicken coop. My brother in law has a very cool plan for "turbo chicken coops". (they are really just cool diy coops) but I'm sure you could finegle some ideas from him.) If you're on facebook, just send him a message and tell him Lorien sent you. https://www.facebook.com/bryan.duggan.52 (Bryan Duggin) He builds them for people who don't want to do it themselves as well.
    Cheers, and keep sharing the gardening tips, Stephanie. Love them!! (really hope this isn't inappropriate.. just wanted to help)

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    1. Thanks for the helpful tips! It seems like chicken coops are popular with the greenhouse fans too :)

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  43. Hi there!
    Love this idea but have a couple questions as I'm making my shopping list, if you can let me know, that would be great

    1) How long of chain did you use for each side?

    2) How did you attach the plastic to the 2 sides? How did you attach the top to the PVC pipe and did you use one long strip or 2? We are going to use cloth and the "Wiggle Wire" system as we live in Truckee and will need to remove the cloth when the snow starts to fly...

    3) what is approx amount of plastic that you purchased?

    4) How did you get the 2 adapters to connect thru the wood for the hoses to attach?

    Thank you for your time, this will be our 3rd attempt trying to grow a garden up here in the Sierra's I think this is going to be the answer!

    Thanks so much
    Michele

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    1. Hello!
      1) It's about 3 ft on each side.
      2) I attached the plastic by stapling it to the wood frame. It is not attached to the PVC.
      3) I used one large piece of plastic (I think it was a 10' x 25' piece of 1.5 mil). The size of plastic will, of course, depend on the size of the bed you build.
      4) I drilled a hole large enough for the adapter to fit through. I got an adapter from the irrigation aisle at the hardware store.

      Good luck with your garden. 3rd time's a charm!

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  44. Thanks Stephanie!
    We have a 10' x 5' raised garden bed... I will do some adjusting to the amounts you gave me but now I have an idea of where to go... I just don't like over purchasing if I don't have too!
    I found some cool stuff on the Johnny Seeds web page that will also help secure the cloth to the PVC as we live at 7,000ft and it can get quite windy up here
    I appreciate your quick response! Can't wait to take on this project, and yes, I think "3" will be the charm this time :)
    Take care and thanks again!

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  45. Hi. That's a nice raised bed garden. I just have one problem. My wife sent me the link so you can guess what she has in store for me this weekend. We have a huge rabbit population so I believe this will solve that issue.

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  46. Love, love, love this design! Love that you used pocket hole joinery. Definitely making a couple of these with a minor mod to accommodate interchangeable plastic and row cover canopies to deal with our zone 4 garden that can freeze anytime from September to May and swelter anytime from April to October. I don't mind having to store the off duty canopy. I'm thinking the solution will involve Velcro straps and reinforced grommets. Will send detailed pix when done.

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    1. Ooo velcro and grommets, great idea!!

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  47. this is amazing! we're also in the bay area (berkeley), we need some shelter from the week of blustery days (what were those 40+ mph winds the other week?!) and just a bit more heat on the foggy ones!

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    1. Oh my gosh right? Wind is my least favorite weather condition, so I really dislike this time of year. Best of luck if you decide to build this!

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  48. This is fantastic! I may well have to add these lids to my raised beds next year! Perfect x

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  49. I built this and I would suggest if you live in an area with high winds you might want to do something to help support it up the sides because I just got in from having to take the top off because it completely collapsed on itself and broke a few of my plants. We've had rain today with some winds but nothing very strong.

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    1. I'm sorry to hear that! We have some very intense winds here as well, and the plastic was ripped off eventually, but the frame is intact. I'm curious, did you use the wire mesh?
      Best of luck!

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  50. My friend and neighbor posted your blog on my timeline on facebook, and I have to say I love the idea and plan to put it to use. However, I am thinking of making two "lids", one for the "greenhouse" effect, the other with bird netting to keep the darned starlings out. Destructive creatures, they tear up my garden or at least try to every year. I will post pictures on pintrest of the "alternative" lid, when I get it done.

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    1. The bird netting is a great idea! I have to say this really gives me peace-of-mind that I won't have birds or squirrels munching on my veggies. If you do get pictures of your plan, post a link here so we can all admire them!

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  51. Hi, my name is Linda Loosli and I am wondering if you would share this post on my website. Please let me know...my readers would love this! Thanks so much. Linda

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    1. Hi Linda! I'd be honored to be featured on your website. I only ask that you not repost the entire article word-for-word, but rather redirect them here. Thank you very much!

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  52. Genius idea! I have been trying to think of something for my raised beds just to keep the critters (deer, rabbits, etc. from eating our produce and this is absolutely perfect! Thank you, thank you, and thank you!

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    1. Glad you found it useful! Happy gardening this year :)

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  53. This is awesome! I am so excited to make this for my first gardening adventure:) Just curious...what size garden quilt did you purchase for this project?

    Rebekah

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    1. Thanks! I bought the 12'x20' and it was plenty for my 4'x8' garden.
      Best of luck with your first garden!

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  54. Hi Stephanie
    Thank you so much for this idea, I am going to make this here in Wellington NZ.
    We have 7 permanent deep beds and a wind problem too, not withstanding the colder winter.
    Right now we are in the last month in finishing our alterations and then I'm going to make these.
    Because we have permanent beds we'll have to make some of the lids removable, but the end beds can all cantilever like yours. Great idea.

    My solution to the lids will be in making the upper frame firmer with battens from the get go, we have stupid wind!
    I intend to staple the mesh and cloth to their own battens 25x10 that will be separate from the upper frame a little more work but more rigid in the long run.
    In all cases I'm going to drill the pipes and battens and base frame and use longer bolts with the nuts inside, that will aid making up and change around between summer and winter.

    My intention is to have a three part roof, two permanent sides to 11am and to 1pm with a gap at 11am - 1pm during summer. (to allow rain and temp control), we still get wind though :-).
    The removable lid part will also have the cloth stapled to it's own battens and drilled out so it can be fixed to the 11 and 1 o'clock battens when needed.
    Just drawing it out now has got me excited as it's a good plan and you've shown the way.
    Thank MikeNZ

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    1. Glad you found inspiration! Best of luck with your gardens :)

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  55. Hey!

    Soil scientist here. While they do impart dead plant material (fertility), pine needles will also acidify your soil. If you notice tell tale signs of soil acidification in your plants (google), try amending your soil with crushed egg shells or lime.

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    1. Hey Hannah! Great advice, thank you for the tip! I googled soil acidification and it looks like my tomatoes are okay so far. I will keep an eye out though. Thanks again!

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  56. Hi Stephanie,
    I really enjoy your blog and I am starting my own based around DIY projects and was wondering if you would mind if I linked to your blog in my list of my favorite bloggers.
    Thanks, Cheers!

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    1. Hi Aaron,
      I would be honored to join your list! I'm glad you enjoy the projects, and thanks for reading!
      Stephanie

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  57. Down here in GA, it's not really wind I'm worried about, and it's hot all spring/summer/fall, but I like this idea to get my late-winter seedlings started. At what age/size do you transplant from this box to the yard? (because you know, tomatoes need at least 2 sq ft each!) I've done raised bed gardening too, and then they might only need about 1.5 sq ft each, if there is about 2 feet of loose garden soil under them.

    This is really ingenious; it might be adaptable to a slightly larger size, so you can greenhouse the actual raised bed when starting seedlings, then remove the cover as the temps warm up -- or leave it attached but fixed in the OFF position, so the cover is there in case of the TORRENTIAL rains we sometimes get here -- real gullywashers that can easily flatten any smallish plants, or even knock down mature tomato plants, if they aren't staked (my tomatoes tend to turn into tomato TREES).

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    1. Hi Andria,
      The plants in the box are there to stay! We recently bought this house and the whole yard is INFESTED with weeds and moles, so the box is the safest place for them right now. I realize I probably got too greedy with my spacing, but I'm only letting my tomatoes grow to about 4' high (that's about how tall the cover is). Next year I plan to build another one of these, so I'll be able to space things out more.

      If you were to increase the size, I would use 2x4s instead of 2x2s for the cover frame, just for added stability. You also want to be cautious leaving the cover in the UP position for extended periods of time because it will act like a parachute and catch even the breeze, which will tear it apart eventually. Definitely more reinforcing of the frame would be in order.

      I'm sure you'll come up with an awesome solution for your garden. And you should send me pics when you do :) Best of luck!
      Stephanie

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    2. I can COMPLETELY relate; we bought this house about a year and a half ago, but just this spring started doing anything with the yard. No veggies this year, too much shade in the backyard and getting tall trees down is going to be expensive, so that's for later. But starting on getting the front presentable instead of the "abandoned property with weeds" look is about to kill me; the clay is packed solid, so it's like bricks that are somewhere between just formed/not fired yet, and half-fired -- essentially just wet brick! Got 6 wheelbarrow loads of clay out of the area we're renovating for 3 rosebushes; just ungodly amounts of sheer backbreaking TOIL and it's already hot as blazes out there -- so I do my gardening between 7am and noon! Frankly I'm afraid it's almost too late to put in the rosebushes, so I've been watering THE HOLES! just to make sure there's plenty of moisture down there for the roots to spread in -- the roses and a Weigela shrub, "Wine and Roses", go in this weekend. Now if the dang slugs would stop eating my petunias and marigolds I'd be a happy camper -- tried sand and gravel as slug barriers already, no go, so today we're hitting Home Depot for some kind of slug-a-cide or repellant. Gotta love those roses; they can defend themselves! (even against deer and bunnies! YES!)

      How would I send pics? I've got a photo gallery website where I'm illustrating the building of this border from "weeds galore" through "drainage mayhem" till it's completed as "floral paradise", but I don't want to spam your site by giving the URL here. (the URL attached to my name is my main one, which has nothing to do with gardening; actually I'm a freelance web designer, just with a green thumb!) :)

      I can see that the wind would cause a real problem if the covers are attached but not fastened down; I guess if I wanted to do something like that, I'd probably want to just use latches on both sides, so it could be removed once it gets hot (usually in April, round here, but later this year, mid-May), but kept handy for those crushing downpours -- I hate watching the supposedly life-giving rain just batter my plants senseless!

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    3. Sorry it's taken me so long to get back to you -- was occupied with getting everything planted, and some of my seedlings moved to their own pots -- gotta have lots of lemon basil to cook with salmon. And then I lost your URL! ARGH! Anyway the URL is http://divineprovidence.crypticsites.com/zen/2013-Building_A_Border/

      It looks quite sparse at the moment, of course, but the annuals will grow fast, and from all appearances, the roses are really taking off too (lots of lovely soft rain this week!). I'm still going to add a few things, and of course finish the end of the stone edging, but the largest part of it is done. Whew! It sure looks a lot better than it did, but I think this house was vacant for a year or two during the economic disaster -- we got it for an amazing price (less than half of what it sold for in 2004).

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    4. I meant to add -- on that same site, in the Gardening/Alpha Dr category, you can see those "tomato trees" I last grew; think that 2009. I actually had some at our previous residence, in deep raised beds, that grew to about 7 feet tall; those were of the cultivar "Bingo" and were the best-tasting tomatoes I ever ate, but in later years I could never find those seeds again, don't know why. In 2009 we determined that "Best Boy" was a better choice than "Celebrity"; both have excellent disease resistanace, but the "Best Boys" have much stouter stems; the Celebrity's stems were so flopsical, I had to stake all the plants massively, and tie up each individual tomato, a huge pain. The Best Boy plants required only minimal staking, but no tying-up at all.

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    5. SLUGS??? Use salt. Not where you are going to put in plants, but make a line along your border. Might have to do it each spring. You can also use 7-dust if you are not sensitive to using chemicals in the soil. If it is just for flowers and bushes (not vegetables). "7" will also get rid of grass hoppers -- apply it twice a season. Keep your pets away from the area for at least 24 hours and water it in good. I tried bone meal as a fertilizer one year and my dogs dug up all my bulbs and ate them -- I think they thought they were bones. LOL.

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  58. I just got most of these supplys from craigs list. Got like 19 2x10's with a lil edege rot. easy to cut down to 2x8 or 6's. Can not wait to buils this project!

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  59. How can I rig something like this to grow marijuana

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  60. over here in england its easy to go to scrap yard and get hatch back struts that could help with lifting up the top part.

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  61. I LOVE this idea!! I live in an apartment and I have been wanting to plant or try & grow gardenias but the worry of living in Az with the heat...they wouldnt survive! I might the green house just a tad bit smaller then this just because of the limited space i have in the balcony...(???) We'll see how my project comes out, i hope WELL :)

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  62. Thank you! We were just trying to come up with something to keep the critters from eating everything in our raised herb garden. Scaled down, this will work perfectly!

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  63. Andria Duncan -- a little help with slugs for you. place corrugated cardboard in your garden and in the morning take cardboard up and burn it. Slugs will hide in the corrugated cardboard. This will keep you from having to put poison out that your dog or cat could get hold of. Also, slugs like beer. Place saucers of beer out in the evening and slugs will get in beer and die. hope this helps you with your slug problem.
    May

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    1. You know we had a slug problem at my parents' house when I was a kid. Then a friend of ours gave us a few box turtles that we let roam free in the yard. Years later, no more slugs :D

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  64. This *rocks* -- bookmarked and sent on to all my gardening pals.

    In my hot, humid climate, I'm thinking of putting shade cloth on the frame that can then be covered with plastic for extra protection for the 2-3 frosts a year that we get.

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  65. Thanks for your creation. I will try and make this for next year I saw it late its a pretty July and my plants wou l d be very late so getting read y for next year,s project.

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  66. I would like to express to you, what a great job building this project at some exceptions i would of used lighter material to build the box itself. I would recommended using 3/4 inch cedar boards and exterior glue and pre-drilled the holes to secure the boards at each corner with galvanized screws. You didn't really tell your readers, how to prepare the soil underneath the green house, as that is important for drainage issue's. I am not knocking you as how you built such a great greenhouse. It's just i am more looking for details, when i read post's. Hardware cloth ihas tighter smaller holes than chicken wire and less flimsy. When i build raised beds, using hardware cloth, i use re-rod 3/8 inch. then drill holes along sides to make the hardware cloth stiffer, no bagging. The pvc piping is always a great way to be able to bend in any degree of a arch. but i would of used the plumbing sockets which are used in plumbing a shower for my pvc pipe brackets, that way you can prime and glue the pipe inside, and there are two holes to screw in your galvanized screws, which i use 2 inch screws. Electrical conduit clamps are good, but you still have to drill out a hole to secure the pipe, so it wont pull out, and drilling a hole on the clamp can be difficult as it is half round. Then for the cover, your use of fencing is great, but i would of used, cable ties to secure the wire to my pvc pipes. Then i would of recommended tarps, they are very inexpensive and come in all sizes and colors, and some are made more heavier. My frame for the covered pvc arch, would of been 2x2 pine boards, pre drilled and screwed with glue at each end. I appreciate your thoughts and designs. But with any type of green house it needs air circulation.You could of built out of plywood side boards cut to fit the designs and then add small venting fans. on a timer.

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    1. Thanks for the suggestions! By the way, it's "would have" not "would of".

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    2. Yes, you are right, Stephanie -- no matter where you are from. It's "could've, would've, might've"

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  67. Where are the pics I want to see how it looks now! hmm have or of probably depends on where you are from!

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  68. Nice blog and thanks for posting this. You have given me a great idea for a cold frame. I'm up the coast a bit in Vancouver but have over 400 sqft of raised beds and am always looking for new things to try.
    A few suggestions, if I may:
    - I use 2x10 lumber, it's cheaper than a 2x12, easier to deal with than 2ea 2x6 and it provides plenty of root space for all my vegetables. This includes potatoes.
    - Pocket screws are a beautiful touch but a little unnecessary unless you are looking for a more finished/furniture-like look. I use 4 in coloured deck screws on each corner. They hold very well and the colour matches the redwood stain I used on the exterior of the boxes.
    - Fill your boxes with Mushroom manure and top them off each year with the same. You can get it by the cubic yard at a garden centre but you'll need a utility trailer or a pickup truck. A 4x8 box will hold approx. 1 cu yd which should be about $30. Mushroom manure is very aerated and will require a little more watering as it dries out more quickly, but your vegetables will love the nutrients. Topping it off each year and adding a little of the compost re-energizes it for the next planting.

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    1. WE go to the county fair each year and get some of that great sheep manure. Top dress your soil wiht about 2 inches of that stuff and your plants will go wild! It does bring in a lot of weed seeds, though but with that little area of garden they are not hard to get rid of -- then use some mulch and it will smother out most of them -- sawdust works great for mulch but don't put it up against your plants or you might get rot...

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  69. Stephanie. your mole/gopher/underground pests are but a few pots of coffee away from never burrowing in your garden again. To keep them out, mix your coffee grounds in with your compost or sprinkle directly into your garden/grass or wherever you want to keep them out. If you do your grass, I would suggest starting at the house and slowly over time, work your way out towards the fenceline and street so the critters will gradually move their dens and burrows. Coffee grounds are wonderful because they break down slow, are a slowfeed type fertilizer, diggers HATE them and worms LOVE them! It's a win win!

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  70. Hi! Just wondering... about how tall is this structure? I'm looking to build one with chicken wire to keep the squirrels out of my blackberry bushes next year.

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    1. The bed itself is 12 inches high and the hoops are 4 feet at the highest point. So total, the structure is 5 feet at the highest point.

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    2. Okay, thanks! I may adjust my plan so that they end up a little higher, but that gives me a starting point. =)

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    3. If you can do that, you definitely should. My tomatoes are quite cramped at the moment!

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  71. Great idea! I am in the Phoenix area and would use shade/frost cloth instead of plastic Don't need a greenhouse here unless you plan on cooling it in the summer:-)This would help with keeping some kind of garden in the summer.

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    1. Oh yes, plastic would cook your plants in that heat! When I started out with plastic, mine would easily get up to 100 degrees on a sunny day, even though the ambient temp was 75 degrees.
      Good luck!

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  72. do not worry about a diagram of where your plants are located because it is a work in progress. U did great w/ the work and photos. Did u get a patent on it? Might be worth cking into. thanks for sharing.

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  73. I like this idea not for a garden but to put on my existing garden bed for chooks. I have four rotating beds but could cut down now to three and rotate a chook bed. Could cover just part with plastic where the bird boxes would go and the rest open. After a season just move it over to the next bed.:)

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  74. This is wonderful and detailed info about building a genius little hot house, but regarding the quantity and types of plants in that one little plot - you're going to have major problems.

    First of all, each tomato plant will rise to over 6 feet tall and at least 6 feet in girth. Each tomato plant should be planted three feet from each other. The cantaloupe plant will take up this entire space alone, and needs to climb. You have too many plants all clustered together too tightly. I speak from unfortunate experience. Good luck.

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  75. Thanks for this Stephanie, it is just what I was looking for to keep the birds out of my aquaponics system! In India, it cost me $80 to make one including the labour to both buy the materials and fully construct it! Totally outsourced job! The joys of living in India! :o)

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  76. I like the support structure for the plastic. Ventilation might have been an issue with the leaf mould.

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  77. I really love this idea! I think I'm going to do this with my bird netting for my new strawberry box.Internet based furniture company

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  78. Stephanie - your patience and grace are commendable! How do you do it? Sincerely, Ian.

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  79. Good morning! We're going to install some bed covers on our raised beds at a school garden in Pacific Palisades. Our issue is squirrels. Current bed covers are very heavy and go over the beds. Do you think the hoop idea would work against squirrels if the wire has smaller holes? I still want holes so the pollinators can visit. The hoop structure looks easier to move. Thanks for any input!

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    1. Hi Marie,
      I think the hoop idea would work fine with a wire mesh of smaller holes. Good luck!

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  80. Brilliant! I'm going to follow your example and create a similar structure, but cover it with nylon net and use it for a recovery area for my milkweed. We've had caterpillars all winter and there won't be plants for the summer if I don't protect some. This will be perfect! Thanks so much for taking the time to post this!

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  81. I am so looking forward to making one of these :)
    Thank you for showing me how :)

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  82. Because I have a bad back and had many surgeries but still wanted to garden , my husband made me a raised garden with cinder blocks. Some years, (probably this year with all the coldsnaps and snow we have had) i was just asking my husband if he could come up with a way to make me a cover so I could start my garden early and not worry about a freeze. thank you for the idea, i will be showing it to him when he gets home from work. this would be perfect for it. My garden is quite a bit longer than this one, but I think we can make it to flip open on both sides. Doing it in two parts will be awesome. Thank you for the idea.

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  83. This was incredibly smart! Thanks for the great description, this I'll try to make this spring. Here's a little windy, so it is probably wise to stick to the covered frame.
    Thank you for sharing!

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  84. Pretty neat, Stephanie. You've inspired me to do this myself. One question - how long is the box overall (I know you mentioned 4 feet wide)?

    Thanks,

    John

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  85. Mahalo (Thanks) Stephanie. This should be perfect for growing various vegetables here in Hawaii.

    Aloha,

    Kawilamana

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  86. Hi there,
    I stumbled upon this by looking for plc pipe structures that I can build. I'm looking to build something similar to this in my classroom, and I'm curious if the PVC pipe came 'bent' like that (with the arch) or if you had to do the bend yourself. I'm totally new to this….
    Thanks!
    Kiki

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    1. Hi Kiki,
      The PVC pipe is pretty flexible so I didn't have to do anything special to bend it.
      Good luck with your project!

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  87. Great, Thanks for getting back to me Stephanie :)

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  88. Hi there. After being thoroughly inspired by this post last year I have decided to build two of these in my backyard this summer to house my organic veggies. Instead of going 12" high, I'm just going to keep them 6" to save money on lumber. From Mel Bartholomew's Square Foot Gardening book I learned that 6" is all you really need unless you're growing root crops like carrots that need more space, in which case you can just build a 1'x1'x6" topper box to place on top of any square to give you the necessary depth. One question I have is about the "wagon topper" part. Is there a way anyone has found of easily changing the material, like from plastic to shade cloth, without having it pulled over a separate structure? Also, I think someone mentioned being able to roll up the bottom edge for venting, but how would this be accomplished and still keep the material snug? Maybe I'll have to do some creative problem-solving on these questions. Or maybe someone else has come up with a good way to vent the cover during the summer months?

    Thanks for sharing this idea and your photos. Very helpful!!!

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    1. Hi Jacob,
      I'm so glad you decided to build your own this year! I like that tip about building little squares to raise the depth.
      You might consider using snap clamps (http://www.amazon.com/Snap-Clamp-Inch-Inches-White/dp/B0050B0N06) for the cover material, which might be a really easy way to change it out rather than stapling it down. If you were to make the ENTIRE wagon topper out of PVC pipe instead of wood and PVC, you might be able to use the clamps on the bottom frame as well. This way you could also take them off to roll up the bottom for venting. Worth a shot!
      For me, the winds are my greatest concern and any gaps in the material will cause the whole thing to fly away. I am lucky though, in that I live in a very moderate climate with no extreme hots or colds, so a fabric cover works year-round.
      Thanks for stopping by! Good luck with your garden this year!

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  89. Hi Stephanie,
    Thanks for your response. Those clamps look like they would work really well. Interesting idea about making the topper entirely out of PVC pipe instead of clamping the hoops onto the wood frame. I'll have to re-think the best way to approach this to maximize efficiency and minimize cost. I'm not as worried about wind in my area, but considering it's almost April and we've still got snow on the ground and many days yet to come with negative temperatures, and in the summer it can go blazingly hot, the ability to switch cover materials is crucial.
    I would highly recommend the Square Foot Gardening book. It's a great resource and focuses on easy-to-understand and implement tips and suggestions.
    Thanks again for all the great info!!

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  90. Hi Stephanie,
    First I want to say is I was born in Albuquerque and raised in Ca. Ok with that out of the way, I am so excited I found your blog. I can't wait for hubby and I to build our greenhouse using your plans. I love it, it looks great. We have problems with squirrels in our yard, so hopefully that should keep the little critters out of my garden. Thank you so much. I'll let your know how it turns out.

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  91. I have just started to build mine and am very excited to start planting everything! Thank you for the great tutorial! Just curious, doyou keep it covered all day and night or just certain times ?
    Thanks!!

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  92. I can't say enough how much I love this! You've helped me figure out how to fix my bird problem. I'm going to do this but will have to do a rectangle frame (using PVC and elbows) because my tomato plants are already too tall. I'm so thankful for your post because I had no idea how I was going to protect my garden!! This is totally doable!

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  94. Thanks Stephanie! These plans are awesome. I showed them to my dad and he had a true fun time making a similar raised bed as a Birthday gift for me. My husband and daughter, as well as our dog are excited for all the produce we will get this summer. (None for the deer!!)
    I listed your site in my recent blog entry to direct more handy visitors to your blog too. Please check out my blog at swamimommi.com to see how we adapted the plans or visit Swami Mommi on Facebook

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    Replies
    1. Wow, what a nice birthday gift from your dad!
      Thank you for the link love. Enjoy your garden :)

      Delete
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